The Enneagram and Lord of the Rings, Part III: Types 6 and 2. By guest blogger, Kelly Gomez.


Sam

Sam

You may recall the Frodo has characteristics of the type 6 Enneagram personality, the Questioner. Frodo makes his way to Mordor, where he can destroy the One Ring, which Sauron would like to reclaim. His friend, Sam, travels with him and is a type 2. They make a great team and Sam supports Frodo through his encouraging words.

 

Sometimes a type 6 can also be pessimistic, but also concerned about the safety of others. The discussion that Frodo has with his friend, Sam, a 2-Helper, demonstrates a type 6’s need for security and support.

 

Frodo: Mordor… I hope the others find a safer road.

 

Sam: Strider’ll look after them.

 

Frodo: I don’t suppose we’ll ever see them again.

 

Sam: We may yet, Mr. Frodo. We may.

 

Frodo: Sam… I’m glad you’re with me.” 

 

I couldn’t help thinking about how happy Frodo must feel to have his friend Sam to be there when he enters the gates of Mordor. Mordor is the place Frodo needs to go before he reaches the top of Mount Doom (in order to have the ring destroyed in fiery lava). Sam is the perfect person to accompany Frodo on his journey because he is on his side every step of the way.

 

Type 2’s bring the sunshine to type 6’s. Their motivation comes from a personal desire to feel loved and valued by the people around them. A type 2 may believe that if he takes care of others, everyone will be okay, and that is what makes him feel happy. Type 2’s tend to be optimistic and try to see the good in all things. In this quote Sam has recognized why venturing out into the world is important:

 

Sam: It’s like in the great stories Mr. Frodo, the ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were, and sometimes you didn’t want to know the end because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end it’s only a passing thing this shadow, even darkness must pass. A new day will come, and when the sun shines it’ll shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you, that meant something even if you were too small to understand why. But I think Mr. Frodo, I do understand, I know now folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn’t. They kept going because they were holding on to something.

 

Frodo: What are we holding onto, Sam?

 

Sam: That there’s some good in the world, Mr. Frodo, and it’s worth fighting for.

 

Ultimately, 6’s doubt or question their decisions so they need encouragement and reminders of why what they are doing is important.

 

I thought the song “May It Be” (originally written by Enya) was a perfect compilation of both type 2 and 6. I liked the version by Celtic Woman, although the film, Lord of the Rings, uses Enya’s version. “May it Be” can be found here. It displays movie clips from Lord of the Rings: Return of the King (4th book), as well as Celtic Woman’s version of the song.  [[The movie clips from this link portray a love story intertwined with one of the travelers on Frodo’s journey, but is different from my interpretation of the song in the next paragraph.]]

 

The lyrics to this song remind me of Frodo as he begins his journey: “You walk a lonely road, oh how far you are from home.” And the lyrics in the second verse and refrain remind me of Sam’s comforting words to Frodo: “When the night is overcome, you may rise to find the sun; Mornie Utulie (darkness has come); Believe and you will find your way.”

 

The lyrics, “May it be your journey on, to light a new day” bring life to the character Sam as a type 2. Type 2’s bring light to every new day with their warm personality and eagerness to make things seem brighter. Sam’s purpose on this journey with Frodo is to bring light to every darkness they encounter.

 

The soothing sound of the strings begin to quiet themselves at 2:26 and gradually rise in intensity until 2:36. Beginning slowly and cautiously, as a type 6 is concerned for safety, they gain courage as the intensity builds and become daring like a counter-phobic 6. The music rises and falls from there, like the similar anxiety a 6 may have with making up his mind. However the lyrics repeat again, “a promise lives within you now” and the music calms again, as if Frodo’s personal journey now has a purpose and direction.  

 

If you would like more information on the Lord of the Rings, you can check out the link below. This is a very entertaining plot synopsis of the triology:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzti9LP7gN8

Quotes brought to you by http://www.imbd.com/title/tt0120737/quotes and http://blog.gaiam.com/quotes/authors/samwise-gamgee/52080

Kelly Gomez is a student at the University of California, Berkeley, majoring in English. She was an extern for Elizabeth for two weeks during winter break, 2014.

 

Frodo (Elijah Wood)

Frodo (Elijah Wood)

 

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The Enneagram and “Lord of the Rings,” Part II: Types 6, 5, and 8. By guest blogger, Kelly Gomez.


3-GaladIf Frodo’s personality type in Lord of the Rings (Enneagram 6, the Questioner) interests you, you might also be interested in checking out these quotes from the book series. Often dialogue helps us to understand a character’s motives, as they express their opinion to another character.

 

In the following passage, Frodo is speaking with Galadriel, the Elven co-ruler of Lothlorien. Originally rings were made and given to the Elves. Galadriel was the keeper of a ring called Nenya, and she used it to keep her kingdom safe. Sauron is the keeper of a ring, too, but he uses it for very evil purposes. The ring Sauron wears ends up getting lost in a battle and comes into the hands of Frodo. Galadriel tells Frodo to look into a magic mirror, where he can see glimpses of the future. Galadriel is aware of what might happen if she uses Frodo’s ring. She believes the ring might corrupt her, as it will corrupt anyone else who wears it. The ring is a source of great power, which is why Sauron wants it so badly.

 

Frodo: If you ask it of me, I will give you the One Ring.

 

Galadriel: You offer it to me freely? I do not deny that my heart has greatly desired this.

 

[Galadriel is now tempted by the ring’s power and starts to describe her possible future.]

 

Galadriel: In the place of a Dark Lord you would have a Queen! Not dark but beautiful and terrible as the Morn! Treacherous as the Seas! Stronger than the foundations of the Earth! All shall love me and despair!

 

Galadriel: I have passed the test. I will diminish, and go into the West, and remain Galadriel.

 

Frodo: I cannot do this alone.

 

Galadriel: You are a Ring-bearer, Frodo. To bear a Ring of Power is to be alone.

 

Galadriel: This is Nenya, the Ring of Adament. And I am its keeper. This task was appointed to you, and if you do not find a way, no one will.

 

Frodo: I know what I must do, it’s just that… I’m afraid to do it.

 

Galadriel: Even the smallest person can change the course of the future.  

 

                    The power of the ring is so great that it has become the object of Frodo’s obsession. He would like nothing more to give the ring up for good, where he would not have to fight against the evil temptations it puts on him. Knowing that Galadriel would readily take the ring eases his burden, however, and he offers it up. But Galadriel decides not to take the ring, reminding Frodo that he alone must carry it. Galadriel’s response is typical of a type 5, the Observer, to suggest that a burden must be carried alone.

 

                  When type 6’s are afraid, they may either respond recklessly or look to those who might be able to eliminate their anxieties for them. Remember, they are team players? Even though 6’s are dutiful with their responsibilities, they often rely on their team to help them out when they feel anxious. Frodo believes if he gives the ring to someone else, he will have escaped the anxiety caused by his responsibility, which is to destroy it in the fires of Mount Doom.

 

   Gandolf2               

 

 

 

                   It is perfectly normal for anybody to be afraid of the ring’s power at this point. However, different personality types react differently when they are afraid. A Type 8 person would be more likely to charge ahead because to be afraid shows weakness. Being afraid is something a type 8 must conquer, because fear is manipulative, and manipulation is something 8’s despise. Sauron is an example of a type 8 at its worst. When Galadriel first knew Sauron, his name was Annatar. She knew him well, and mistrusted his thoughts and motives, yet never took action against him. Later his name was changed to Sauron, when he became evil with the forces of the One Ring and his personality changed to combative, possessive, and arrogant.

 

Because she is “Conscious of Sauron’s power, and wish[es] to thwart it, she [does] not openly use the powers of her ring as long as the One Ring [is] in Sauron’s hands. However, during the Third Age, when the One Ring [is] lost, she [puts her ring, Nenya,] to good use protecting the borders of her realm. For the powers of her ring [are] protection, preservation, and concealment from evil.”( www.lotr.wikia.com)

 

Galadriel is similar to a type 5 because she takes precautionary measures to secure her kingdom in a non-confronting manner. She does not make accusations against Sauron until he uses his ring to control the nations and keepers of their rings. Galadriel simply waits until he loses the one ring (now in Frodo’s possession) and does what she can to keep herself safe. She believes that whatever battle over the one ring is to take place will be between Sauron and Frodo.

 

The introduction to the movie, which explains the origin of the rings, can be found here:

 

While listening, notice the pattern in the background music that was created to represent Sauron’s character. Its intensity closely resembles type 8, the Asserter, in the Enneagram.

 

 Kelly Gomez is a student at the University of California, Berkeley, majoring in English. She was an extern for Elizabeth for two weeks during winter break, 2014.

 

Join the FaceBook page The Enneagram in the Movies.

 

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See Elizabeth’s appearance on TV talking about “The Enneagram of Death.”

 

4-Gandolf

 

The Enneagram and Lord of the Rings, Part I: Frodo, Type 6. By guest blogger, Kelly Gomez


Frodo (Elijah Wood)

Frodo (Elijah Wood)

How do authors create dynamic characters for their novels? Many people believe authors know people who are characters in themselves, and choose to write a book based on the characters in their own lives. Sometimes, although less common, authors create characters that were inspired by a well-known personality type. There are plenty of personality types out there, derived from many different systems, such as the Myers-Briggs system, The Temperament God Gave You temperament system, and the Enneagram. The Enneagram is an interesting personality system because it teaches us how different people are motivated; whether it is a drive for success, emotional security, or the need to feel loved.  

 

                  In the series, The Lord of The Rings, and in the first book (The Fellowship of the Rings) a hobbit, Frodo, is called by a great wizard to go on a long and perilous journey. Frodo agrees to venture on this journey because he believes it is his duty after he is entrusted with a magic ring. The ring holds an insurmountable power, and must be destroyed before powers of the Dark Forces discover it. The only way for the ring to be destroyed is if it is taken to Mount Doom by Frodo. One thing clearly explained in the first book of the series is that most hobbits never leave their homes or communities under any circumstance. What is surprising is that Frodo joins Gandalf and agrees to leave his home behind. He is accompanied by his gardener and friend, Sam Gamgee. (Pictured, Frodo Baggins)

 

                 What kind of hobbit would choose to leave all the comforts of food, warmth, and shelter in order to venture on a dangerous journey?

 

                  Frodo’s personality is similar to the type 6 personality of the Enneagram, the Questioner. A type 6 makes decisions based on their need for personal safety. Frodo may feel that not returning the ring could put his life in danger if the Dark Forces were to find it in the Shire (where the hobbits live). Sometimes a type 6 may choose to take risks (even dangerous ones) in order to conquer their fear of risk taking. Frodo is like a counter-phobic type 6 and prefers to boldly confront danger instead of run away from it. Type 6’s are also very loyal and dutiful and seek the guidance of those in authority. It wouldn’t be unusual for Frodo to accept the ring that was given to him by his uncle, and to accompany the great wizard on a journey (as his duty) to prevent the Dark Forces from destroying the world.

 

A few bloggers have also commented on who they believe Frodo to be:

 

“Frodo definitely is possessed of a noble and admirable character. We can look at the various words used in this criterion by definition: Noble – lofty and exalted character – showing greatness and magnanimity; Magnanimous – noble of mind and heart; generous in forgiving, above revenge or resentment; unselfish; gracious; Admirable – to have a high opinion of; to esteem or respect.” (lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net)

 

 “INFP…Frodo Baggins.” (http://mbtitruths.blogspot.com)

 

“Frodo, the ring-bearer, carrying a burden that ripped him apart from the inside and almost destroyed everything he was…had the vision, bravery and resolve of character to get the ring all the way to Mordor… [To] not recognize him as one of the noblest of heroes shows a great lack of understanding of the power of evil and forgets that though Frodo makes it look easy, it wasn’t.”

 

 

Merry and Pippin

Merry and Pippin

 

According to The Enneagram Made Easy, written by Elizabeth Wagele, type 6’s like to work in teams. At the edge of the Shire (the town where Frodo lives), he meets Merry and Pippin, two other hobbit brothers that decide to join him. Frodo (a type 6) welcomes them on his journey because he knows that it would be more fun with others to accompany him.

 

Kelly Gomez is a student at the University of California, Berkeley, majoring in English. She was an extern for Elizabeth for two weeks during winter break, 2014.

 

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Visit http://wagele.com to check out Elizabeth’s books, CD, cartoons, essays, music, and Famous Enneagram Types.

 

Religion an Issue Between Dogmatic Dad and Searching Son


Image

This is a story from my book, The Enneagram of Death. Tom’s father is a skeptical and mistrustful 6-Questioner personality type and is motivated to protect himself. He trusts his church and the afterlife but he’s pretty grumpy about life on earth. He’s Tom, however, is a 9-Peace Seeker who looks for commonality among people and is seeking the truth.

 

Death Will Be Graduation Day

 

 

 

By Tom Purcell.

 

 

 

             My father died a month before his 94th birthday. He was a social subtype Questioner through and through. He often complained about “the powers that be,” yet enjoyed socializing with them; he was instrumental in the campaigns to re-elect our local Member of Parliament, yet refused to run for office himself; he was friendly with everyone he met, especially the underdogs of society. Yet he often said he was unable to trust anyone.

 

            My loving father maintained his intellectual faculties until the last few months. During his last ten years, following a few minor surgeries, he experienced brief periods of memory impairment, but bounced back quickly. The official cause of death was old age.

 

He was a devout Roman Catholic with an unshakeable belief that he was going to heaven. His concept of heaven wasn’t elaborate, but he did expect to see predeceased friends and family members there when he arrived. He never disclosed to me what they were, but in his later years he expressed regret about mistakes he had made in his life.

 

            Overall, he was accepting of his fate. He didn’t believe the world was such a great place with all the moral corruption, poverty, wars, and suffering. Life on earth was a test of faith, and death was graduation day.

 

In light of the current health consciousness and the focus on physical well-being, I found it interesting that my father ate red meat daily, drank alcohol, smoked, never exercised, carried at least 70 extra pounds, was always worried about something, had high blood pressure and cholesterol, and was never particularly happy or relaxed. However, he was proud of the fact that he never ever missed Sunday Mass. Perhaps he was onto something.

 

            A major theme of his stories was a mistrust of authority figures and an inability to express emotion. He felt powerless to change any aspect of the world. As a skeptic, he believed politicians were skillful liars and the news media were the mouthpieces of rich and powerful interests, but he was loyal to his wife, his family, his employers, his religious faith and his political views.

 

He was afraid of losing his job, although he held the same position for over 23 years, and he often expressed suspicion of other managers at his workplace. His co-workers wouldn’t listen to him when he said their employer was headed for bankruptcy, but his fear of being out of work inspired him to seek out another job. Three months later he found out his former employer had indeed gone out of business. My father had landed a much better position, even though he was already in his mid-fifties. He attributed his success to prayer and God’s work—never giving himself credit for his own virtues. I wished he’d take pride in his reputation for scrupulous honesty and loyalty to his employer.          

 

 

I questioned his blind faith in a belief system that had evolved through many centuries. In its highest expression, through the example of the loving kindness of Christ, it commands its followers to “love thy neighbor as thyself.” My father, however, divided the world into members of his club and nonmembers. It bothered me deeply as a young man when he spoke negatively about people who did not agree with his beliefs. I became even more frustrated when he refused to discuss religiously based beliefs at all. Now, however, I can understand my youthful desire to seek the essential truth in all religions as rather threatening to my dogmatic father.

 

            When I was a teenager, I would try to engage him in theological debates about other religious traditions, but he would dismiss anything that didn’t conform to his own narrow and rigid interpretation of official Catholic dogma. Later in his life, he softened somewhat and relaxed his rigid views when he acknowledged, “good people of all faiths go to heaven.”

 

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right doing, there is a field. I will meet you there ~ Rumi

 

 

 

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Young People Talk about the Enneagram and Death, Part III


From "The Enneagram of Death" by Elizabeth Wagele

From “The Enneagram of Death” by Elizabeth Wagele

Continuing what my panel of mostly young Enneagram types had to say about death at the International Enneagram Association conference last August , Max, the 6-Questioner, said, “I work in community health. One of the clients I’m seeing is drinking himself to death at age 52. He’s a pleasant drunk who acts like a 7-Adventurer and has been abusing his body. We all know that someone who refuses treatment can’t be helped. I went to his house a week or two ago. He was pissing on himself, sitting on the floor drinking his third beer at about 10:00 a.m. I told him, ‘You’re dying.’ He said, ‘Yes I know. I was taken to the hospital yesterday. The doctor told me I had one week to live.’ I sat with him that morning as he faced his death, his circumstance, and it brought me up against my own death.

 

“If a person is a danger to himself or others and can’t be trusted, we can do what we have to do to help them. But alcohol is in a gray area so we community health workers can’t do anything about it. Generally, the reaction of the mental health community is paranoid—to overreact. But I wasn’t told I could do anything. This man had burned all his bridges and was purposeless. Even his son didn’t want to have anything to do with him.

 

“I realized death is simply a transition. Most people clutch to the enjoyment of life but we don’t know what’s on the other side. It could be less difficult than life. I’ve gone through losing a father and close friends. Vicariously living through this man, I didn’t fear dying. I realized I like my attachments and friendships, but I also realized death doesn’t have to be something to be terrified of. I shared this with my supervisors and they said, if the person really wants to die….”

 

Bonnie, the 7-Adventurer, said, “I prefer not to think about death. I don’t like to think about negative emotions so I try to think about the good parts of death: letting go, the end of something. My own death feels more like a deadline; I only have this much time to get all the things done I want to do. It’s pressure. The only people I’ve known who have died have been very old or suffering for a long time and we knew it was coming. I’m still somewhat naïve. I don’t like thinking about the pain that would come.”

 

Claus, the 8-Asserter, said, “I have the sense that I’m the one in charge. I want to make sure my children and my wife are independent and capable before I die. My children aren’t old enough to take care of themselves. They have to be strong enough to be independent.

 

“I’ve almost never lost anyone…  I lost my former fiancée when she was very young. When I hear a story about death, it’s hard to allow that injustice. Why did that person die?

 

My fear is only about people around me, not me. I’m a lot more terrified of being crippled—that’s much higher on my brain than my own death. A friend’s friend’s daughter was run over by a truck that backed over her. He held her. Then she died.  She was 3. How should I ever live ever if anything happened to my daughter? When something happens to kids it freaks me out.”

 

Part I was Sept. 24, Part II was Oct. 8. See Part IV (more of type 8; and type 9) Oct. 29. The inspiration for this workshop was the book, “The Enneagram of Death.”

 

 

Read my blog about healing PTSD in Psychology Today Oct. 2.

 

 

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