Obama as All 9 Enneagram Types – in Cartoons


Obama   As you may know, we have all nine Enneagram personality types within us, though we mainly express the viewpoint of one of them. So in 2008 when Obama was running for president I drew cartoons of him from all nine points of view. I believe Obama’s primary type is the Peace Seeker. We’ve seen that played out in his tendency to mediate and try to include all sides when promoting a program. Here’s a drawing of Obama and Michelle as Peace Seeker monks. The Dalai Lama is a Peace Seeker too. This represents their spiritual and humanitarian nature.

If you’d like to download these 9 cartoons to your web site or email, go to http://wagele.com/obama/index.html They come in 3 and 4 inch sizes.

Obama leans heavily on his Perfectionist wing (also called a “One”) for the ability to be organized, his skill speaking and writing, his self-discipline, and his idealism. I’m skeptical about the hand saying he’s on the left in this cartoon. He stayed with his conservative predecessor’s war policy and kept much of Bush’s economic staff. But he’s certainly to the left of Romney in most ways.

Obama as a Perfectionist

Obama as a Perfectionist

Obama

Obama as a Helper

The Helper image is portrayed by Michelle here, adoring her husband.

She’s playing the role of nurturer and lover.

I couldn’t put all the cartoons here because of problems spacing them on WordPress. My Obama Achiever cartoon has him looking in the mirror paying attention to how he’s dressed. Obama dresses well as do most Achievers. How they look and how others perceive them is important to them. They’re sometimes called Performers.

I don’t think Obama would be mistaken for the Romantic personality, the artistic type. Romantics tend toward depression or melancholy. Obama seems like a caring person, however, as are most Romantics. When Romantics use their Achiever wing they’re sometimes flamboyant, the way he’s dressed in my Romantic version of him.

Observers tend to be independent and are often nerdy. This could be the scholarly attorney part of Obama, the part that likes history and knows what’s going on in the world. Questioners are known for their loyalty and for watching out for what can go wrong. This is his protective side, trying to keep us safe.

Obama

Obama as Adventurer

This Adventurer woman would love to have Obama for president. She wants to elect an intelligent president. The Adventurer in Obama would be his good sense of humor.

He must use the Assertive part of himself to have made it to president. He has an Asserter wing and I’ve heard he can get very angry. If he’s elected again, I hope he uses more of his Asserter in dealing with Wall Street – to fix what’s wrong with the banking system. His administration hasn’t restructured it as promised three years ago.

 See my Psychology Today blog on the movie Carnage and wagele.com for Famous People’s types and more..

“Adventurers” as Children (Type Seven)


The Adventurer, from "The Enneagram of Parenting" by E. Wagele

This cartoon shows an Adventurer child giving a sparkling performance, cheered on and supported. Adventurer children are usually curious, lively, charming, and have many interests. They often do best when they can pick and choose from a rich learning environment, since having many options appeals to them. Routine does not. Adventurers tend to be extraverted, sociable, and talkative, but there are exceptions. Freedom is good; boredom and restrictions are bad from their point of view. Adventurer Norris said he felt like a grasshopper in a world of ants when he was a child.

Adventurer children are usually positive, happy, optimistic, have many friends, and think well of themselves. They may sign themselves up to do too much, but they’re usually resourceful and learn fast. They like to be spontaneous.

Likely variations on this type are those who resemble the Observer type and are studious and focus well and those who resemble the Perfectionist and try to do things right. These two types are at the Adventurer’s “arrows,” the lines that radiate out from the 7th point in the Enneagram. The wings, the Questioner and the Asserter also frequently influence Adventurers, in the first case by adding a more light or jittery feeling to the personality and in the second by adding a heavier, more or definite feeling.

With this post, I will have covered all nine Enneagram styles as children in my WordPress blogs in the past six months. Often, I feature the same type as an adult the next week in my longer, alternating “Psychology Today” blog.

Reminder: Ingrid Stabb and I will give a presentation on our Wagele-Stabb Career Finder from “The Career Within You” on Saturday, July 31, at the International Enneagram Association conference in San Francisco. administration@internationalenneagram.org

We’re also hosting a party for our book at Maxfield’s in the Palace Hotel at 5:30 on the same day, to which all are welcome.

To buy “The Enneagram of Parenting”: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

“Observers” as Children (Type 5)


Drawing by E. Wagele from “The Career Within You,” by Elizabeth Wagele and Ingrid Stabb, HarperCollins.

The Glasswing Butterfly is a symbol for the sensitivity of the Observer personality. Observers aren’t all super-sensitive or delicate, but many don’t like loud noises, glaring lights, or rough clothes against their skin. Most prefer to stand back and watch what’s going on from a safe distance and most avoid conflict. Observers tend to live in their heads. They can be rich containers and synthesizers of information for the rest of us. If we’re highly extraverted, particularly, we may not notice them because they tend to be quiet. Some of them are forthcoming about their opinions, even argumentative, and bring attention to themselves. Others are shy.

In “The Enneagram of Parenting” http://www.wagele.com/EnneagramParent.html I wrote, “Observer children don’t usually care about social conventions and don’t always interact easily. They may feel awkward or different from other children. Never push them but gently invite them to join in… They’ll do almost anything to avoid unpleasantness. Some wish they could speak without thinking about it so much first. One-to-one contact is often more comfortable than being in groups.” One of my cartoons in this book is of an alien child who has just embarked from a spaceship and is looking at a bill board advertising toothpaste that says, “Use ‘SMILE!’ Impress everyone! Be noticed!” She is saying to herself, “I’m not sure I belong here.” As an Observer child myself, I didn’t relate much to “image.”

Observer children are usually good at finding things they like to do. Reading is often one of them. Some are attracted to investigating things on computers or the workings of computers. Some become scientists. Some become writers. Some are good at classifying material or mechanical things. Observer children often have an independent streak and easily feel intruded upon. Sometimes, because they don’t mind solitude, a parent worries about their social life and becomes pushy in that regard. Observers are often content with one or two good friends.

Cartoon from “The Enneagram of Parenting.”

This week (April 1, 2010) my blog on Psychology Press will be on Observers as adults, http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-career-within-you/

Raising the “Questioner” Child (Type 6)


Drawing from “The Enneagram of Parenting”

In the Enneagram system of personality, the sixth style is called the Questioner. Things don’t feel safe, as though one is at sea or rolling around on balls or wheels. Where will my greatest safety come from – a strong, brave stance or a weak “protect me” one? Whom can I trust? Is this object hollow or solid? Are you pushing me or am I pulling you? Am I safer standing on your shoulders, with you standing on mine, or with like-minded warriors both on top of me and underneath me? Is there safety in numbers or am I better of going it alone? Maybe I need to learn to scare people off before they have a chance to get me. It helps to lean on a bigger authority sometimes or to put on my boxing gloves. My mind is always whirling around with these thoughts of how to protect myself so I can be prepared for anything.

In “The Enneagram of Parenting” I don’t use the words in the paragraph you have just read. I let the cartoon speak for itself instead. In fact, I drew this cartoon about thirteen years ago and never quite put the concepts into words for myself until now. I did feel, however, that the whirling symbols seemed like the Questioner (“what if…?”) part of myself, one of my wings since I’m a 5-Observer.

For each of the nine styles of children, I drew one cartoon meant to represent the general idea of the style. This was that cartoon for the Questioner child. I hope it conveys the feeling-tone accurately enough for them and their parents and teachers to relate to it. It’s a challenge because there are many variations within each style. In this case, though, I feel it has held up well. Questioners want to know who the authority is and I think this authority is someone you can count on. He has such a strong face I think it’s okay he doesn’t have legs and it’s kind of funny he’s made out of a question mark. In fact, that’s probably a healing aspect of the cartoon. Just what a Questioner might dread the most is right here for all to see and is creating no problem at all! The authority is itself poorly balanced on a ball, not even touching it! So, at least in cartoon-land, you don’t need an anchor after all, you see? The cartoon is YOU in most of your Questioner aspects, suspended with no security, yet surviving instead of toppling over. This all wouldn’t work if it was spoken in words as I have just done. But I hope it does work as a cartoon.

Questioner children need order, predictability, and to learn to trust their inner authority. They need to learn to built confidence in themselves and in their ability to meet new situations, which means they need to be treated with patience and calmness. My book helps parents and teachers by showing learning styles and what different types need in terms of adult attitudes. Children vary a lot in their inborn traits that govern how fearful they are, their study habits, social adjustment, and so much more.

The Enneagram of Parenting by Elizabeth Wagele. HarperCollins publisher

Buy now at Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

Today I Posted Another “Psychology Today” Blog


So I’ll do an original blog in this space next week. Ingrid Stabb and I are busy with our new book this month and next. It’s going well. Some events coming up are February 8 on TV (“View From the Bay”), February 9 at Kepler’s Books in Menlo Park, Feb. 21 at the CA Writer’s Club in the Oakland Library, a pod cast or two, and lots of reviews – and they’re all good. So we’re happy.

I just put up two videos of me and my cartoons on You Tube: “The Happy Introvert” is http://bit.ly/HapInt/  “The Creative Enneagram” is http://bit.ly/cre9gm/ There’s also another very short one there and on the HarperCollins website.

See the reviews of THE CAREER WITHIN YOU and other info at http://www.careerwithinyou/ You can download material to use from this site and upload my cartoons to share on your computer or website at http://www.wagele.com/

My most popular page on wagele.com these days is the Famous People page, followed by the introvert pages and Beethoven pages. You can hear a chapter (the 7-Adventurer) right on the site, too. You can also hear my Enneagram piano variations. All this exposure of myself is beginning to make me nervous. Eek. My Psychology Today blog is about the subtlety of telling two Enneagram points apart that are hard to tell apart, the Adventurer and the Achiever.

Here’s one of my favorite cartoons from the chapter on Perfectionists in THE CAREER WITHIN YOU. It doesn’t fit this blog particularly. I just like it. Hey! That’s the best reason to use it of all!

What’s Virtuous about Fighting for Kitties?


Asserter carpenterLong before I heard about the Enneagram personality system, I knew I needed to model myself more after the personality type I was later to learn is called the “Asserter,” as seen in the example above with the tattoo on his arm. He tells it like it is and is more than willing to fight over his truth. He loves kittens. Unlike his co-worker, he doesn’t consider this affection an affliction. It doesn’t lessen his manhood one iota. So there! Good for him. I admire a person who honors truth! This decisive, confident archetype of the Asserter was well known to me for most of my life without having to be taught about it. So the Enneagram made sense: it imparted truths of human nature. The nine types were there to see and to check out. They weren’t arbitrary. I saw them in the people I came in touch with every day.

Being an Observer with a strong Romantic wing, I’m fond of authenticity. I’m an INFP in the MBTI system, which means I’m a soul-searcher, an artistic type. I’ve been writing books and drawing cartoons for 15 years and I play the piano. I love the arts. But for the past few months I’ve been doing little but marketing my newest book, “The Career Within You.” The Observer in me is curious and enjoys new areas of learning. I’ve learned about Twitter, Facebook, blogging, Flickr, You Tube, and a few other marketing tools. I spend hours each day on these things and some of it is fun. My dreams at night seem to be telling me I’m clogging up my creative side, though. It’s true–I’ll have ideas about future projects and start on them only to abandon them for some deadline having to do with marketing.

I’m like the guy in the cartoon. He probably wants to go home and play with his kitten. He’s not a wimp and neither am I. We just know what we like. He’s telling the world about his passion and I’m telling the world about mine right now: the Enneagram. There are many reasons I love it, too many to lay out here. But two big reasons are: •1)  the Enneagram pinpointed my type for me, the Observer, so that instead of feeling on the outside, I was comforted to know that my “group” was seen. • 2) the Enneagram has possibilities for great good in the world as a tool for healing racial, cultural, and religious divides. It is already saving and healing individuals and groups and I want to see its usefulness expand. I think my books are good for that. http://www.wagele.com If you’re one of my fans, you can help with my social marketing project in many ways. A fun way is to go to my CARTOON SHARING PROJECT on my home page, lift the html of some of your favorite cartoons, and put them on your own web site or other forums and help spread the word that way or in emails.

When Children Are Pressured to be Who They Are Not


Jung believed the psyche is as physically based as our physical properties, but in his time most people believed children were blank slates to be filled in by their parents. “The Career Within You” supports Jung’s beliefs. It helps career-searchers get underneath to who they really are in order to approach their life’s work from an integrated place. It helps you match up your career and your true self. If this doesn’t occur, look at the cartoon of what might happen! Oh no!

Too many times people are pressured to follow a career the family or a teacher chose for them that was not based on their real desires and gifts. Too often in these difficult financial times people grab a job that has nothing to do with their lives, when taking a little more time to investigate themselves could lead to a much more fulfilling career. Please take that extra time to get to know who you are and what you want.

This cartoon is on page 28 of my book, “The Happy Introvert.”

I Get By With a Little Help From My Dreams


Lady with hanky If my dreams were removed from my life’s history, I wouldn’t know who I was.

Dreams started shaping my life starting with the first dream I can remember at age 4 or 5.  This dream influenced me to feel separate enough from my family to go inside and look for meaning in art and music. http://wagele.com/enneagram5.html In adulthood I began taking some dream classes and drawing my dreams. Getting practice drawing sparked an interest in creating cartoons, which led to trying to produce greeting cards with my friend Renee. The greeting cards didn’t succeed, but we realized there was a need for an accessible introductory Enneagram book just then, so we turned to writing one ourselves, using my drawings for non-verbal learning and to spice it up with humor. “The Enneagram Made Easy” http://wagele.com/easy.html  led to several more books and hundreds more cartoons. So in a practical way my dreams created an enjoyable second career for me following the career in music that I started out with.

Here on the left is a part of one of my dream drawings.

There are two other reasons why I love dreams. First, by paying attention to almost every dream I have, and by taking some of them to groups where I can hear what other people have to say about them, I learn  things I need to learn about myself, for example to be stronger, to take certain things more seriously, and to look at parts of myself I might be neglecting. As of today I’ve recorded 1710 dreams. Several themes stand out and certain symbols recur. When their meaning becomes clear, many things tumble into place. My dreams have given me major gifts.

Second, studying my dreams and the dreams of those in the dream groups I belong to is a fascinating activity–an  interesting glimpse into the psyche. I marvel at my teachers’ gifts at interpreting and intuiting dreams’ symbolism and meaning. It’s  interesting to watch the methods my own unconscious mind comes up with “behind my back” to get points across to the me I know myself to be. Dreams trick us into taking them literally, when that’s probably rarely where the real meaning is. So it seems crucial to me to have input from at least 5 or 6 other people to help me get the point.

Would I like to have a career as a dream writer or teacher? If I were as gifted at working with dreams as some of the dream teachers I have worked with I’d consider it. I’m surprised at how many people think dreams are not important, that they’re just the mind’s clutter from the day. I find my dreams to be more intelligent than anything I can come up with in my waking life after I delve into them to figure them out. “The Career Within You” http://www.wagele.com (available December 29, 2009) will probably emphasize dream-related careers in future editions as more people see the importance of our dream life to our psychological health and wholeness.

Cultivating Mindfulness


Mandala

Yesterday I had lunch with some friends. I was feeling guarded about one of them, who will often fly off the handle in the passion of presenting his positions on things. I have quite an even temperament and I don’t always do so well with people who are the opposite from me in that regard. I tend to feel overwhelmed by their emotions and lose track of myself. So before we met I felt uneasy considering what I might do about this. But as I observed him talking to another member of our group I noticed what an emotional person he is–and I let it in that this has nothing to do with me. I think I’ve been seeing him as intimidating me all too readily. As it turned out, he never did go into a rage that day. Now that I have greater insight into myself, I have time to work on my own attitude before we meet again in a few weeks. I will try to accept him as a person who is unlike me; he is emotionally based. Hopefully I have tender feelings, but I would never express them so dramatically. Either it’s not my in-born style or maybe I’m too timid. He probably represents my shadow.

As often happens, this breakthrough (I call it a breakthrough because I had been struggling with this person’s temper for a long time) didn’t come out of the blue. It comes on the heels of a much larger breakthrough concerning a family member. Being mindful was a help to me in both cases. After receiving a wrongfully accusing letter from a relative, I had plunged into a negative feeling state and started to obsess about how to react. Several times I considered pushing my feelings away and trying to forget the whole thing, but my energy was so intense I decided something productive might be percolating inside of me. I had felt similarly when in on the verge of creative breakthroughs in the past. Sure enough, in another couple of weeks I had solved a big puzzle. After trying to be open and waiting, things came together and the story of this tangled relationship started to make sense. I was glad I had stuck it out, including working hard on the dreams I had during this period, and able to make more progress on this situation than I ever expected. So taking the “positive” route doesn’t always achieve the best results. Sometimes hanging out in an uncertain or even negative place turns out to be the best in the long run.

“The Career Within You”


What a tragedy it is to possess such natural gifts and to hide them from ourselves and the world. Elizabeth and Ingrid are great detectives who would have you understand your perfect habitat for all you can bring to the workplace. – Chip Conley, Founder/CEO Joie de Vivre Hospitality and Author of “Peak.”

In our book, “The Career Within You; How to Find the Perfect Job for Your Personality,” every career type is expressed in the type of desk it might use. Here is one example:

Typical desk of an Asserter.

Typical desk of an Asserter.

You can imagine your own ideal desk (if you use a desk at work). You should find something close to it in one of our 9 career-type chapters–this or another one. The way you’ll know your career type is through our writing and the description of many people who’ve held careers talking about their own experiences. My cartoons will also help.

After reading all 9 type chapters, you’ll go back and take the Wagele-Stabb Career Finder at the end of the chapter you most closely identify with. This is more personal than you might think, because we’ve found a way to base the outcome on your own highest strengths within your type. Then you’ll match your own preferences for careers with the careers people of your type have shown they were best suited for. I can’t tell you how proud we are of this test we devised.

So if you’re looking for a job or need to manage the job you already have, get to know yourself as well as you can and learn what you can do for yourself to achieve practical results. Our book has two other chapters that will guide you through the job finding process with great expertise. I’m not boasting. This is mostly Ingrid’s forte, having been counseling people in careers for a long time. She knows so much about resume writing, networking, and all the ways to negotiate for a job.

Our book has its own website: http://www.careerwithinyou.com (It will be up and running in November of 2009.)

I have my own website: http://www.wagele.com All my books are on there, plus reviews, articles, and ways to order them. There’s a popular Famous People section, too.

You can see us and information about our book on http://www.HarperCollins.com Write in Ingrid Stabb, Elizabeth Wagele, or “The Career Within You.”